How To Pass Your Driving Test: Junctions

Here are a few questions you should ask yourself to find out if you are ready to take the UK driving test. One of the most common places that test candidates fail at are junctions. So lets have a look at some of the junctions that you might encounter and how to deal with them safely.
How To Pass Your Driving Test Junctions
The first junction we’re going to look at is the “T” junction. Things we need to be aware of, that the examiner will be checking while we deal with “T” junctions are:
- Observations: do we take effective observations before we emerge into the junction.
- When we do emerge, do we cause other users to slow down or change direction because of our actions?
- And finally, what about our position, both on approach and once we enter into the new road.
These are some of the things that you need to be able to deal with confidently and at the right standard when it comes to “T” junctions.
Other things we need to know about “T” junctions are:
- Being able to differentiate between an open junction and a closed junction, an modifying our approach at these junctions accordingly.
- The other thing we would want to do is being able to deal “T” junctions on a hill. So we need to make sure we know how to do a hill start on a “T” junction, as well as being able to take effective observations to prevent the car from running backwards at the same time, making sure it’s safe for us to proceed.

Turning from a major road to a minor road
This is another type of junction that the examiner would be expecting us to deal with appropriately. Make sure that your speed on approach is good and that you also use the LSN(?) routine to signal given road user adequate time for you to be able to slow down enough to deal with the junction at a safe speed.
A common mistake that many test candidates make is the try to get out from the major road as quickly as possible because there are care behind them. Once you have signaled, then it is important that you take time to make sure that you know how fast you need to be going to get around the junction safely.

When turning right from a major road to a minor road, make sure you give way to oncoming vehicles but do not make the common mistake that a lot of test candidates do and give way to people on the right who have a give way and should be giving way to you. So do not be intimidated by cars at the give way, trying to force their way into the main road. You have priority over them.
Crossroads are another junction that you might have to deal with. In particular, you need to be able to know who has the right of way and when it comes to crossroads that are not marked be extra cautious and make sure that you deal with the junction safely.

All of these will take a lot of practice and experience to deal with. So don’t think that just because you’ve had 20 lessons means that you are adequately prepared. You might not have enough experience to deal with all the types of junctions that you might encounter during your driving test.
Many roundabouts are another type of junction that you might encounter during your driving test and the examiner would still expect you to be able to deal with them safely, avoiding and due hesitation as well as being able to deal with other road users, and being able to deal with busy junctures safely.

Major roundabouts are another type of junction that the examiner will be assessing you on, both single lane and multi lane roundabouts. Some of the major roundabouts, especially those on dual carriage ways, could have speed limits between 50 and 70 miles an hour. So you need to have enough experience to be able to deal with these if you do encounter them on your driving test.

 

Manuel runs manuel driving school, and independant driving school based in London England. If you need help with your driving lessons and are based in London then please stop by my website.